Delaware Space Beer

Delaware Space BeerJust when you thought Oktoberfest couldn’t get any better than a long weekend booze marathon and foreign beer, NASA finds a way to top it.

Not one to be outdone by normal German beer, the company behind NASA’s Apollo spacesuits and a Delaware brewerry have added moon dust to their beer. They’ve given it the appropriately galactic name of ‘Celeste-jewel-ale’, and you can buy it (on tap) at the Dogfish Head Brewings and Eats restaurant.

What does space beer taste like? It’s creators have described it as having “notes of doughy malt, toasted bread, subtle caramel and a light herbal bitterness”.

Dogfish Head enlisted the help of contractors ILC Dover, the guys behind the lunar spacesuits worn by the Apollo astronauts on the moon. They were able to track down the lunar meteorites for the beer as well as provide space-age beer coolers, or koozies. We’re a little impressed.

Unfortunately, as meteorites don’t come around every day, this beer is limited time only. “ILC is making sure this is the best-protected beer on the planet with koozies made from the same material as their spacesuits,” the restaurant wrote on its website.

The koozies are protected against fire damage, friction and tearing, and are insulated to keep the beer at a comfortable temperature.

Wipe your drool and start planning your trip to Delaware. It’s limited time only, and let’s face it, it’s space beer. What wouldn’t you do to try it out?

Published on Urban Society / 08 October, 2013

Walk on Water at Lake Baikal

Baikal.adventure.walk_.on_.water_Hey there, you big nomad.

What if we were to tell you there’s a frozen lake the size of Belgium that would take you four days to walk across?

Fascinating enough to quench that wanderlust?

This is something to go on every thrill-seeker/Insta-bragger’s bucket list. If the frozen lake isn’t quite enough to pull you across the line, theres the ancient Buddhist communities (“I really connected with the locals, man.”) and adrenaline filled dogsled rides.

But first you’ll have to experience it all.
In Siberia.

Yes, Siberia. Don’t let it’s chills-inducing name put you off – where else except in sub-zero temperatures can you walk across a picturesque frozen lake?. It’s one of the oldest, deepest and largest lakes in the world, not to mention one of the most beautiful. Nothing like the freezing crisp mountain air to make you feel aliiiiiive.

Screen.Shot_.2013.11.19.at_.11.03.11.AM_

Included as part of the UNESCO World Heritage List, Lake Baikal features 120ft of clear, fresh water. In warmer months you can grab a wooden boat and take in the beauty above and below you, but we suggest planning for colder weather.

In winter months (February to April) the lake freezes over and transforms into a wonderland the size of Belgium. Here is when the magic happens and you can walk, or take a dogsled, on water.

Screen.Shot_.2013.11.19.at_.11.02.41.AM_

 

Also on the check list when you inevitable head Siberian way: check out the history of nearby Russia, take a Russian cooking class, go on a jeep expedition, explore crystal caves, see the holy Buddhist stupa, meet the indigenous people of Russia and go ice rafting.

Or, for those less-inclined to do such pedestrian activities like actually planning a trip, book a tour and leave it up to those other suckers. 56th Parallel has tours starting from $4950, so you better start pinching those pennies.

[Image Source]


Published on Urban Society / 19 November, 2013

Argentina Ghost Town new tourist attraction

Underwater2Would you believe that this place was a bustling tourist town just thirty years ago?

It’s called Villa Epecuen, and lies just south of Buenos Aires in Argentina.

In 1985 the town experienced a particularly heavy rainstorm, followed by several wet winters. A dam finally bursting on the 10th of November, 1985, submerging the town in water. People waited on their roofs for two days for the water to recede, something that didn’t occur until 2009.
Underwater1

Established in the 1920s, the town used to be a thriving spa resort. Now it features dead trees and signs pointing to nowhere. Remnants of tourists can also be found among the rubble, including coke bottles, plates and glasses. The most unnerving feature is the trees, which still stand in neat rows.

In a twist of fate, the Argentinian town is a tourist attraction once again, but this time as a ghost town, attracting visitors who come to gape at the ruins.

underwater5

Villa Epecuen was home to 5,000 residents and thousands of tourists. Now only one man lives here: Pablo Novak. The 83-year-old, who has lived in the town since his youth, never left. He was the only one to return when the town drowned, living there ever since in a stone hut with a fridge and a basic cooker.

“Whoever passes nearby cannot go without coming to visit here,” Novak said to The Associated Press. “It’s getting more people to the area, as they come to see the ruins.”

Many of the other residents fled to nearby Carhue, building new hotels and spas.

Published on Urban Society / 04 October, 2013